Helping Students Retain Course Content | Origin: ED108

This is a general discussion forum for the following learning topic:

Learning Theory and Practice --> Helping Students Retain Course Content

Post what you've learned about this topic and how you intend to apply it. Feel free to post questions and comments too.

Guided notes and mnemonics and games always seem to be a good way not only to learn for the students, but you get to keep them engaged while learning and retaining informatio.

 

Students need a clear definition of what is required of them for each course.

 

I always use Mnemonics in my class its amazing how the students are able to recall facts quickly.

 

Scaffolding and Mneumonics

 

Guided notes are useful and helpful, especially for the student who has been out of the classroom setting for a few years, letting them know what will be covered

     I learned from this module the importance of understanding how learners decode and recode course content. Selecting instructional supports such as scaffolding, guided notes, graphic organizers, and mnemonics enhances student learning. There are different ways to help students retain course content, but in the end, reviewing needs to be done to evaluate if the teaching methods used were effective or if any changes need to be made. As an educator, I am constantly assessing and evaluating my teaching styles and methods. By knowing what works and what does not, I can make the adjustments to achieve my goal of being an effective instructor and helping my students retain the course content to help them complete their course.

Great fun creating mnemonics.

I really like the idea of guided notes and grahic organizers to help the student learn important note taking skills and to help them outline the key concepts they will need to know. 

 

This module was a good review of various learning tools to helpo my students better decode and recode new infromation. I will definitely incorporare more visual diagrams and guided notes into my future lesson plans. 

Provide clear direction for a path of learning.

This section was a good reminder of various learning strategies that can be used to both decode and recode information.  I find graphic organizers, guided notes, and mnemonics to be helpful when I am learning new material.  I think my role as instructor is to be aware of and observe students to determine if they need assistance with "learning how to learn", at which point, I can demonstrate and/or use some of these strategies in the classroom so students can incorporate the ones that might work well for their learning style.

The decoding and recoding was a significant lesson for me and gives me a better understanding of how material ought to be presented.

The idea is make sure the strategy is identified and then used by the students. You are not only building the knowledge base of your students but will be giving them strategies that will help them learn the content. You will be adding learning "tools" to their mental "toolboxes." Your students will start to look for these strategies in your future lessons as well as develop strategies of their own.

 

There are a number of different mnemonic devices that you can share with your students as they learn your course content.

 

I believe it would be important to present all these methods to students so that they can compare them to their own learning styles and choose the most effective ones that fit those styles. Mnemonics, loci, acronyms may all work but which is the most effective for the individual learner, that is the important thing to discover. 

The recoding strategies were the most enlightening and engaging section for me, specifically guided notes. I had tried a variation of guided notes in the past, but I don't think they were particularly useful (to be fair, it was my first semester teaching and I was building curriculum on the fly). With more experience and the guided notes strategies, I could implement them in a much more meaningful way. I feel it'd be particularly helpful since my courses are so content heavy!

Mnemonics have been effective not only for myself but for the students as well.  The students seem to enjoy making up their own to remember what was taught in class.